Images of student works from Amy Wilson’s foundation drawing class (part 1)

The next two posts feature images of student works from Amy Wilson’s spring 2017 session of Drawing II (FID-1135), the second half a first-year foundation course that explores “drawing as an act of producing independent works of art and as a preparatory process in organizing a finished work.” The pieces were created in response to two different assignments, so I’ll devote a separate post to each.

First up is the alphabet project, which was the initial assignment for the semester. Students were required to create one drawing to represent each letter of the alphabet. As you’ll see from the examples below, the project is fairly open ended, and students often come up with a wide range of inventive responses to the initial prompt. All of the captions below are based on comments Amy provided along with the images. (You can click on each to zoom in and see the details.)

 

Drawings by Jiazhe Shi in which figures pose like the letters.

Drawings by Jiazhe Shi featuring figures posed like the letters of the alphabet.

 

Joey Gonnella's alphabet was based on several of Wes Anderson's films

Joey Gonnella’s alphabet was based on characters from Wes Anderson’s films.

 

Calla McInnes counted how many times each letter of the alphabet appeared in the transcript of Donald Trump's inaugural address and displayed the results on 26 sheets of paper.

Calla McInnes counted how many times each letter of the alphabet appeared in the transcript of Donald Trump’s inaugural address and displayed the results as raw data on 26 sheets of paper.

 

Will Knutson presented 26 stains made by things from this everyday life, one per letter (examples: M is represented by milk; S by saline solution)

Will Knutson presented 26 stains made by common items from his daily life (examples: M is represented by milk; S by saline solution for contact lenses). The actual stains are in the small Ziploc® bags, and the larger images are enlarged scans.

 

Shaoshuang Guan's alphabet combines Japanese schoolgirls with references to various horror and fantasy tropes from manga, anime, etc.

Shaoshuang Guan’s alphabet features schoolgirls representing horror and fantasy tropes inspired by manga, anime, film, etc. (I’m guessing there’s some yokai folklore in there as well.)

 

This is one image from Max Kornfield's project, which consisted of portraits of their friends, one for each letter.

This is a detail from Max Kornfield’s project, which consisted of 26 portraits of their friends, one for each letter.

I’ll be back in a couple days with images from another of Amy Wilson’s Drawing II class assignments.

 

Visual & Critical Studies